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January 25, 2014
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Shrinky Dink charm before-and-after comparison by MoonsongWolf Shrinky Dink charm before-and-after comparison by MoonsongWolf
Will be moved to scraps eventually.

Someone a while back asked me how much shrinky dink material actually shrinks during the baking process, so I took some before and after photos of my latest charm. A good rule of thumb is that you will end up with something about 1/3 the size that you started with. You can see here that my charm went from about 4" to about 1.5" inches during the baking process.

Please note that I use shrinky dink brand sheets (the "ruff n' ready" type), and I bake them according to the included instructions. I can't vouch for any other brands or baking techniques.

(If you don't know what a "shrinky dink" is, google it; it's a pretty nifty material)

Artwork and photos are  MoonsongWolf
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:iconjessilamyen:
jessilamyen Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Professional Artist
did you use some kind or gloss or some some sort on it and if you did, what kind? Also, what does the behind look like. i tried it and the behind sort of looks weird and i dont know if thats normal. 
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
I use a spray gloss fixative (the brand is Krylon) on the "drawing side" of the charm, in order to hold the colour in place. I'm not actually sure how necessary it is, but better safe than sorry! I have a friend who makes these who uses clear fingernail polish on hers, and that also seems to work just fine. Depending on your colouring style, the reverse side might look different than the front side that you coloured on. This is because the charm is transparent, so if you layer colours on top of each other, you will ONLY see the bottom layer on the reverse (where it will hide subsequent layers that you put on the top). I imagine that this effect is lessened if you use markers instead of coloured pencils, but I haven't personally tried that. Hope that helps! :)
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:iconwyverra:
Wyverra Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ohh I've got to read about this material and find out if I can get it in Poland, it looks awesome!
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2014
If you can't find it, let me know! I can buy some for you next time I go to the art supply store and then just mail it to you. :)
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:icongreenhuntingcat:
greenhuntingcat Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2014
Quite informative!
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014
Thanks, I hope people will find it a bit helpful! :)
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:iconcloudwilk:
Cloudwilk Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2014  Student Filmographer
That looks really cool! I want one now XD
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014
Ha ha, thanks! They're a lot of fun to make. You can check in craft stores (or online) for the paper. It's not terribly expensive. :)
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:iconl1nklover:
L1nkLover Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
What kind of pencils do you use on these? (If you don't want to say or if this was answered somewhere else you don't have to tell me :XD:)
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014
I use prismacolour pencils for everything except for the lineart (I just use a regular uni-ball ink pen for that). :)
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:iconl1nklover:
L1nkLover Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ok, Thank you^^

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:iconalfafilly:
AlfaFilly Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm always impressed how the quality of these seems to stay in tact fairly well despite shrinking. I should try these sometime :'0
Reply
:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2014
Same here! They keep a surprising amount of tiny details. You should definitely try some! If you can't inf the paper in your area, let me know. I can pick some up for you next time I visit the art supply store. :)
Reply
:iconalfafilly:
AlfaFilly Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
So I apparently saved this message in my inbox so I could remember to check for Shrinky Dink paper! And low and behold I searched and did find some! :D I made a huge lot of them with a friend of mine. Extremely fun! Although I admit we got a little rambunctious with a couple of them and took them out of the oven too soon and they cracked/warped/got strange depressions in them haha Trial and Error I suppose. But very fun all the same. :)

I am curious though, do you use frosted paper or clear? And do you color on the backside of it or the front? I looks like you use frosted and from the front but I'm not positive. We used clear which I wouldn't buy again because we had to scratch the surface to get the pencils to retain anything. We also colored them all from the back (ink on the front, color on reverse I mean) which created an strange holographic look to it which wasn't exactly desired but was interesting at least. I'm just curious for future endeavors.
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2014
Oh my gosh, I'm so sorry for the late reply! I've been terrible about getting online and actually checking my messages lately. :(

I use frosted paper! It's called "Ruff n' Ready," and it works very well with coloured pencil. Colouring on the frosted side is a must, though! It won't work well on the shiny side. Also, I recommend using a clear sealant on it. In addition to protecting the pencil, it will also give exposed frosted parts a more transparent, glassy appearance (which I personally find more visually appealing). I have used the clear stuff, but it only works "out of the box" with markers or pens. If you want to use pencil on it, you have to score the surface, as you've discovered. The easiest way to do this is with sandpaper... but I personally still prefer to just drop a few extra dollars per pack to get the prepared frosted stuff. Lazy me. :lol:

Although I haven't tried ink on the back and colouring on the front. That actually sounds like a cool effect! Might have to try it sometime. :D
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:iconginger-love:
Ginger-love Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
it's so beautiful !
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:icond-rock92:
D-Rock92 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
That's impressive. This explains how there is so much detail in something so small.
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2014
Yeah, it's sort of like making a digital painting at a very large size and then shrinking it down. It keeps a lot of the fine details. It's a very cool process!
Reply
:iconjellybean839:
jellybean839 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
how do you keep yours so flat?? whenever i try to use the shrinky dink brand it just curls up :(
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Mine curl up initially, too. The trick is to NOT take them out of the oven when they start to curl! As long as you have the temperature set properly, they will begin to uncurl themselves again after about 20-30 seconds. I almost panicked when I first saw mine start to warp, but luckily my partner convinced me to be patient, and they flattened again. If worst comes to worst, you can also take them out and, while they are still warm, sandwich them between two sheets of wax paper and push a book down on them. I typically do that anyway just to make sure they are extra flat.

Hope that helps! :)
Reply
:iconjellybean839:
jellybean839 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
thank you so much! i think i freaked out and started messing with them when they started curling, so i'll have to try that next time. thank you!! :)
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:iconlyrak:
Lyrak Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Wonder if I can use the wax paper and book trick after I've used a heat gun on them... because my oven is weird and would probably just burn them. x.x It burns everything else.
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2014
I think the only trick would be to make sure that your heat gun doesn't get so hot that it scorches your art/paper before it shrinks. I think the optimal range is somewhere between 330-350F (I bake mine at 325), and if it is much hotter than that, everything might get burnt. Good luck! Maybe make a few really quick test doodles and try them out with both the heat gun and the oven to see what works best.
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:iconlyrak:
Lyrak Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
It's specifically a crafting heat gun. :) Marketed for embossing primarily. I've played with the heat gun some, I just keep getting curly arts. LOL
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:iconfiremaster13:
FireMaster13 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Is the product what you color on with different media? It looks like you used watercolor or pencils, but it's hard to tell.

I'm guessing you just create your design directly on the material and then follow the instructions?
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
I use an ink pen to do the lineart (which I just trace from a pencil drawing that I make), and then they are coloured with coloured pencils. I have used acrylics on these, too, but I find that they don't work nearly as well as coloured pencils. You have to make sure that you have the rough version ("ruff n' ready") rather than the slick version, otherwise you have to sand down the surface in order to use coloured pencils.

I have so far only drawn directly on the paper, but there are versions that you can print on. And, yes, I just follow the directions for baking, then follow it with a couple of coatings of spray fixative.
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:iconfiremaster13:
FireMaster13 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you for the information! It sounds like a fun medium to work with.
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:icondrahgonwolves:
DrahgonWolves Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is so cute! Great job, Moon!
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Thanks! :)
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:icondrahgonwolves:
DrahgonWolves Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Don't mention it!
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:iconbrokenvine:
brokenvine Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Oh wow! This is fantastic! I had shrinky dinks in the past, and seen loads of them here on dA, but this is amazing! 
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Thanks! Ha ha, I think I have more fun making them now than when I was a kid. :)
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:iconnever-mor:
nEVEr-mor Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This makes shrinky dink look more interesting to me. Do you use colored pencil on it?
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Yeah, they're actually a lot of fun to use! You can make some pretty cute designs. And, yes, I use coloured pencil for most of the charm (the lines are done in ink). :)
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:iconiametoh:
IamETOH Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
lol didn't think those things made it past the the '80s
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Yeah, I remember buying the pre-printed Disney ones in... oh, the mid to late 80s, I guess? You can finally buy blank one now, so that you can make your own designs. They're actually really awesome for making small charms for necklaces, keychains, or danglers! :)
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:iconiametoh:
IamETOH Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Yeah they look like they finally have a use
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:iconpainted-flamingo:
painted-flamingo Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
thank you :la:
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:iconmoonsongwolf:
MoonsongWolf Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
No problem! It's simple, but I hope it's helpful. :)
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:iconpainted-flamingo:
painted-flamingo Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
very helpful! I've had some of this paper but have been hesitant to use it not knowing how large to make things. Now I'll have to give it a go :la:
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